In Design Tips, Direct Mail Marketing

Mistakes to Avoid When Creating your Direct Mail Brochure

You won’t believe how many direct mail brochures that seemed rather a jumble of words and cool features I’ve seen as a printer. If I’d got something like that in my mailbox, I would trash it immediately.  Direct mail brochures are, in fact, one of the most versatile and easy-to-use materials of the print marketing.

Whether it’s a bifold, trifold, or maybe something a bit more creative, a direct mail brochure is a great way to give a descriptive and informative view of your company, church, non-profit, or event. In plus, it gives you more space for elegant images than a standard postcard and more room for compartmentalized sections and features than a letter.

What to Put On Your Brochure

When you have decided on your audience and the purpose of your brochure, your next step is planning the information to put on your brochure.

Make sure you are putting in only useful information from your clients’ perspective: whether you want them to learn more about your product or service or to make an immediate order. Don’t jam-pack your brochure with unnecessary things.

  • Include the branding elements that make you stand out from the competition
  • Specify what you are selling:  a brand, an event, a product, a service, or an idea.
  • Highlight your unique selling proposition: your competitive advantage.
  • Have a clear and easy to follow Call to Action.
  • Indicate a few ways to get in touch with you.
  • Gather high-quality visuals of what you are selling.

Other Important Aspects To Consider

Less Is More

Picture this, as a printer we have worked with many small and larger businesses and many clients want to jam pack their pieces with facts about their company, and other things they consider appealing, plus tons of images. What these clients should understand is the more you throw in, the less appealing it becomes.

Creating a visual flow with a copy and supportive graphics is the most effective way to establish a connection with your reader. You don’t have to fill all of the space just because it’s there. Less is more.

Promote a single product or service at a time

This is probably the most frequent mistake made by the small businesses in direct mail brochure marketing, treat a brochure like a complete product or service catalog. The goal of your brochure is to generate a response, not to familiarize your customers with your facilities and your company’s mission statement.

Targeted niche campaigns are always better than broader campaigns. Identify the most likely to buy prospects and target them with a professionally designed high-quality direct mail brochure and a single product or service at a time.

Your unique selling proposition

The most important element of your brochure is your unique selling proposition. How can you separate yourself from your competition? Is it quality? Customer service? Low prices? In what reside your uniqueness? Experts recommend reframing your expertise so that what’s usual in one setting becomes revelatory in another. Think about who needs your products and services but doesn’t typically have access to them.

The letter from your mailing package

Include in your mailing package along with your brochure a sales letter. Why letters pull so well? They create a sense of personal connection. We are accustomed to viewing letters as “real” mail, and brochures as “advertising.

 

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